Our Family Stories

Christ (Kristo) Dedic was born on 16 September 1881 in the fishing village of  Kampor on the Island of Rab, Dalmatia, Croatia, Austro-Hungarian Empire. Kampor is on the south-western part of the Kvarner island of Rab, on Kamporski bay.  Kampor is known for homegrown vegetables and fruits as well as recently caught fish.  Christ became a sailor in the Austro-Hungarian navy and learned to handle high explosives. He married Antica Peric, a native of Kampor.  He died in retirement just short of his 81st birthday in September 1962 in St. Louis, Missouri. He was buried on 11 September 1962 in Resurrection Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, Missouri.

According to family oral history, Christ visited Saint Louis, Missouri during the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition.  Information from the Ellis Island Archives indicates that Christ lived in New York around 1909 and 1910.  He sailed to America in 1910 on the Steamship Oceania and returned to Antica  in 1911.  Again, he sailed to America on the Steamship Argentina in 1912, prior to the birth of their child, Annie (Anica) on 19 January 1913. Antica and Anica joined him in America on 30 August 1913. They had four children that lived to adulthood.  A daughter, Sophia was their first born, but she died very young.  A son, Anthony died shortly after birth in 1926. 

Christ Dedic Family (1921): L/R Antica, Joe, Annie, Mary and Christ

 

Ellis Island Archive: Dedic, Kroto Austrian, Dalmation Kampor, Austria August 10, 1910 29y M M Oceania Triest, Austria, Austria-Hungary


Steamship Oceania: Drawing by Duncan Haws 

 

The Steamship Oceania was built by Russell & Company, Port Glasgow, Scotland for La Veloce Line, in 1908. She displaced 5,497 gross tons; she was 391 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide; and she was powered by steam triple expansion engines with twin screw. Her service speed was15 knots and she carried 1,350 passengers (45 first class, 75 second class, 1,230 third class). 

She routinely sailed between Trieste-New York and Trieste-Canada. Disabled by a World War I mind, she was beached in the Adriatic on October 3, 1918. Shortly thereafter, she was blown up by the Austrians to avoid her falling into Italian hands on October 15, 1918.

Ellis Island Archive: Dedic, Kristo Austrian Kampos, Austria July 10, 1912 31 M S Argentina Triest, Austria, Austria-Hungary.

Steamship Argentina: Photo Richard Faber Collection 


The Steamship Argentina was built by Russell & Company, Port Glasgow, Scotland, for Austro-Americana Line, Austrian flag, in 1907.  She displaced 5,526 gross tons; she was 390 (bp) feet long; 48 feet wide; and she was powered by steam triple expansion engines with twin screw. Her service speed was 15 knots and she carried 1,450 passengers (45 first class, 175 second class, 1,230 third class). 

She routinely sailed between Trieste-South America and Trieste-New York.
In 1918 she was converted to a hospital ship.  Later, she was sold to Cosulich Line, an Italian flag, in 1919, for Mediterranean-New York service. In 1926, she was sold to Florio Line, an Italian flag, in 1926. Finally, she was sold to the Tirrenia Line, an Italian flag, in 1932.  She was scrapped in 1960.

 

 

Antica Peric was born on 16 May 1890 in fishing village of Kampor on the Island of Rab, Dalmatia, Croatia, Austro-Hungarian Empire.  She married Christ Dedic in XXXXX on XXX, XXXX. . Antica and six month old Annie (Anica Antica) immigrated on 30 August 1913 to Ellis Island, New York arriving on board the Steamship Kaiser Franz Josef.  Christ and Antica had five children.  She died on 16 September 1941 in St. Louis, Missouri. She was buried on 19 September 1941 in Resurrection Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, Missouri.

Steamship Kaiser Franz Josef I: Photo Richard Faber Collection 

The Steamship Kaiser Franz Josef I was built by Cantieri Navali Triestino, Monfalcone, Italy, for Austro-Americana Line, Austrian flag, in 1912. She displaced 12,567 gross tons; she was 500 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide; and she was powered by steam quadruple expansion engines with twin screw.  Her service speed was 18 knots.  She carried 1,905 passengers (125 first class, 550 second class, 1,230 third class).

She routinely sailed between Trieste-South America and later Trieste-New York route. During World War I, she was laid up at Trieste from 1914 to19. She was sold to the Cosulich Line, and Italian flag, in 1919 and renamed Presidente Wilson and sailed the Mediterranean-New York route.  She was transferred to the Adriatica Line, an Italian flag, in 1930 and renamed Gange.  She was then put on the Trieste-Far East route. She was transferred to the Adriatica Line, an Italian flag, in 1936 and renamed Marco Polo. She entered the Venice-Alexandria route.  She was laid up from 1940 to 43 during World War II and then sunk. She was refloated in 1949; then scrapped in 1950.

 

 

They had the following children:

    F i Anica Antica Dedic (also known as Ann Denker)
    M ii Frank Joesph Dedic
    F iii Mary Stephonia (Stella) Dedic
    M iv Anthony Dedic was born in 1926 in Saint Louis, Missouri. He died in 1926 in Saint Louis, Missouri.
    M v Anthony Marion Dedic

 

 

 

   
Message from OurFamilyStories.com:  The information and data provided in this website, that hasn't been identified as belonging to others, is to be used for personal NON-COMMERCIAL purposes only.  It is not to be reproduced in any form for commercial or profit purposes without the express written permission of OurFamilyStories.com.

The information on this web site is for your personal use only. All pages, compilations, transcriptions and abstracts are protected by copyright law and may not be copied in whole or in part and published or distributed in any manner without written consent of the author, contributor and/or webmaster.

Every effort has been made to report accurate information concerning our family members.  Some mistakes may have been included, and they are unintentional.  Please contact us if you have additional information concerning family members or information contrary to what has been reported.

Copyright 1995, 2005. OurFamilyStories.com. All Rights Reserved.
Your comments & suggestions are always welcome.
Last Updated 17 January 2007